Author Topic: Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds  (Read 464 times)

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Online sapapadop

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I recently purchased a Juzisound module for my electronic wind instrument (EWI wind synthesizer), and I need to comment on how great it is. It is made by a young musician from Bulgaria (who also does all the programming and engineering). This MIDI compatible sound module can be used on any keyboard or MIDI controller device and features a HUGE library of authentic Greek, Turkish, Arabic, Bulgarian sounds and loops made by real instruments (kemences, zurnas, neys, kavals, duduks, bouzoukis, baglamades, clarinets, saxophones, percussion etc.) I have been looking for realistic sounds outside of Kontakt instruments that I can use at gigs (I hate lugging around my laptop to gigs), and found this handy module that gives you easy access to amazing quality sounds. They ship worldwide.

They have also expanded and made a MIDI module to add to an accordion -- turning your accordion into a full-fledged synthesizer. 

Check it out!

Juzisound website
http://www.juzisound.com/products/solo_sampler.php

Juzisound samples
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfVi7P7a1_A

A little 'Salea' sample with the additional breath controller for keyboardists
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GYbtgayJ94

Offline Eleftarios

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2018, 10:22:30 PM »
Awesome sounds. I think it shows a lot of potential but I'm to old now to figure it out.

Online sapapadop

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2018, 09:38:23 AM »
Not too difficult. Really just a matter of plug and play into your MIDI device. There are additional advanced features to use that take some time to learn (like automated arpeggios and scales for various maqams) but the company has helpful videos online.

Offline SOLO

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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2018, 04:23:05 PM »
NONSENSE,
FAKE

Online sapapadop

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2018, 06:07:26 PM »
NONSENSE,
FAKE

Excuse me? I gave you the official website

Offline a_hennig

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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2018, 07:37:08 PM »
Solo's not contesting the accuracy of the website info you gave. He has a thing against electronic sound production and electronic modification of your sound.

To a degree, I agree with him. Working to communicate to an audience (and to fellow musicians) with a purely acoustic instrument is a very different dynamic than with amplification. It changes the way you play, and it changes the way the group responds to the music. One could write half a book on the subject, just on what I've personally observed over the years. We are in serious danger of losing altogether some of the benefits that God gave us in music.

On the other hand, it must also be recognized that there are real benefits available in the new technologies, and that the ways in which we express ourselves have never remained static for any length of time. Century in and century out, the old guard has always complained of the changes and the youngsters have always insisted on making them anyway. Nothing new there.

What is perhaps new, is the real danger of isolating ourselves through our music instead of forming and molding community through our music. There is an unprecedented tendency to listen to our music in private, and even the variety of music available to us, beneficial as it can be, coupled with the ipods and other methods of listening in private, tends to separate rather than unite us, unless we make a deliberate effort to share. And when we go to dances in which the volume of the amplified music is such that one cannot talk to one's neighbor, we become isolated by the very music that we gather to listen to together.

This does not, however, in and of itself, mean that there is anything wrong with the new variety of sounds and methods of using them. That part is, as I said, "same old same old." The voyage of discovery through life doesn't end here.

Online sapapadop

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2018, 11:14:38 AM »
Love your post a_hennig. I totally understand where you and SOLO are coming from.

In no way am I claiming that a synth can ever even attempt to sound as rich as a purely acoustic instrument. I'll be the first to admit that it can't. Just try to find a VST or software patch (within any reasonable budget) that can effectively mimic a saxophone for example. And I completely agree that in the context of live performance, no amount of electronic circuitry can ever be an adequate substitute for real musicians displaying their command of their instruments.

As a technologist myself though, I appreciate this module's technical capabilities offering high quality representations of Eastern European and Arabic acoustic instruments to any musician with a MIDI port. On the technical side of things, this module interestingly uses a simple quick-read SD card port to read all instrument data as opposed to utilizing complex internal memory and requiring convoluted software on the user's end, which most modules made by big companies tend to do. Also, the use of SD memory allows you to store hundreds more gigabytes than can be stored in devices that use internal memory. And all of this is much more interesting in my opinion, given that it's hand-made by a small start-up out of the Balkans.

Aside from the technical advantages though, and more to the points mentioned in the previous posts, modules like this offer the ability to explore new sonic colors and expressions from remote parts of the globe. Given the universality of MIDI, virtually any device can simply plug in and begin exploring sounds of eastern music that many of us in this forum have come to love. In the age of Pro Tools and Garageband, where one can self-produce music on a simple laptop, modern musicians have the means to orchestrate with sounds beyond the confines of their respective individual instrument. And besides, why should it just be keyboardists that have all the fun of experimenting with synthesized sounds?

Despite the valid criticism of technology that you guys rightly pose, I fail to see a “danger” of isolation in what I do, or the way that technology is morphing the sounds of our time. I am never going to put down my saxophone, my clarinets, or my neys. I am never going to stop exploring the rich musical traditions of our ancestors that we here at GTC enjoy discussing and sharing. But I am also not going to shut out any new innovations to musical technology, especially ones that have the potential to prompt conversation, and hopefully add a breath of fresh air to the musical conversation that we all have chosen to engage in.

Lastly, on a pedagogical note, I do believe that widespread public willingness to learn musical instruments is and will continue to be in decline in these days of extreme globalization—especially as concerns traditional instruments. In this sense, I do agree that there is a very real danger of isolation and stagnation. In a world laden with videogames and smartphones, kids these days just don’t have the patience to listen to seemingly antiquated musical styles from the other side of the world that feature polyrhythms and musical modes foreign to modern ears. And now that attention spans last only a few meager minutes, where will young people find the patience to put in the time and organically learn a musical instrument with a teacher, as most of us did?! However, technology, and the access and affordability that comes with it, can be a benefit, rather than a burden in this regard. People now can learn more at an accelerated rate (just look at the success of Youtube, Yousician, or this very forum at inspiring people from all walks of life to pick up a new instrument and explore a different musical style), and I submit to you that the innovative forms of creativity that technology continues to bring are a source of new musical inspiration for many younger performers. Just look at, for example, the success of many modern Balkan and Gypsy artists like Chantal, Goran Bregovic, Gogol Bordello, Balkan Beatbox, Dubioza Kolektiv, Imam Baildi, Koza Mostra, and Gypsy Hill, that blend the timeless traditional sounds of Eastern Europe with the power of modern electrified rock and funk. I think if we want to attempt to ameliorate any threat of isolation or stagnation to our beloved traditional music, we should not be closing our ears to the sounds and technologies around us.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 01:26:38 PM by sapapadop »

Offline SOLO

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 03:11:37 PM »
FAKE MECHANISMS FOR PRODUCE SOME SOUND TODAY ... YNFORTUNATLY  STAVROS TOO...
i.e. https://www.facebook.com/KostasPaparousopoulos/videos/10155790172410159/?hc_location=ufi
NOTHING BETTER THE NATURAL SOUND, I THINK

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2018, 03:53:51 PM »
I also knew what Solos point was, and i agree with him as well.  However i am a fan of both, if you can produce a good quality sample sound i believe it can sound close to "authentic".  don't forget even Stavros and other pros alter what we call a natural sound with octavator and other effects.  so in reality there is no "authentic" sound unless you play acoustically.  but i believe when we talk about authentic sound is how the early players sounded, and that IMHO cannot be achieved unless you use their setup and style.  at the end what matters is how the audience like it.

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Online sapapadop

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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2018, 05:41:54 PM »
Agree with you guys. Like in most things, when it comes down to it, natural is always better  :TU:

Offline a_hennig

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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2018, 10:18:56 PM »
FAKE MECHANISMS FOR PRODUCE SOME SOUND TODAY ... YNFORTUNATLY  STAVROS TOO...
i.e. https://www.facebook.com/KostasPaparousopoulos/videos/10155790172410159/?hc_location=ufi
NOTHING BETTER THE NATURAL SOUND, I THINK

But he does it so well, doesn't he?


Sapapadop, some reflections on your comments, in inverse order:
I do believe that widespread public willingness to learn musical instruments is and will continue to be in decline in these days of extreme globalization—especially as concerns traditional instruments. In this sense, I do agree that there is a very real danger of isolation and stagnation. In a world laden with videogames and smartphones, kids these days just don’t have the patience...

I, too, see this has been happening, and I believe that in the short term (i.e. two or three generations) it will continue to happen. But I think that the patience problem is only a part of the picture. Our recording success is also a big part of it. We love being able to listen to the masters, in any genre of our preference, from any time period, and whenever we want. The flip side is that gone are the days when any gathering of families who love music included the participants playing and singing together and for each other. I used to play table to table in restaurants, and I loved it, as did the customers, but you don't have to pay the PA each time it is played, and except in a few areas, such work is now rare. Until recently, people still usually hired bands for big events, though, but the disk jockeys have been taking over there, too. Given all that and the fact that most school boards are cutting out the arts in favor of more time for math and science, who's going to devote the time and effort it takes to learn to play an instrument, or even to sing decently? It takes a lot of work to learn it, and it takes constant use to keep it in shape and it takes more time and effort to keep in work nowadays than one puts into the work itself. We still need music, and that's not going away, but the days when one out of every three or four people knew how to play something decently are gone. But, you see, it's a technology that we dearly love that put us in this place. There's no answer for it, it just is what it is.

Quote
Despite the valid criticism of technology that you guys rightly pose, I fail to see a “danger” of isolation in what I do, or the way that technology is morphing the sounds of our time.

This isn't actually what I meant to say at all. Fact is, I don't really know what you do, so I have no opinion whatsoever about it.  Overview-wise, I mean to say that there are both benefits and drawbacks in the technologies we use.

Quote
As a technologist myself though, I appreciate this module's technical capabilities offering high quality representations of Eastern European and Arabic acoustic instruments to any musician with a MIDI port. On the technical side of things, this module interestingly uses a simple quick-read SD card port to read all instrument data as opposed to utilizing complex internal memory and requiring convoluted software on the user's end, which most modules made by big companies tend to do. Also, the use of SD memory allows you to store hundreds more gigabytes than can be stored in devices that use internal memory.

I don't think that it's so much that the internal memory's more complex and convoluted-it tends to use similar technology nowadays. Omitting the RAM is an interesting concept, though, and new to me, though I don't keep up like I used to. What really makes it cool, though, is that someone's designed the thing so that by using the SD cards for your samples you can add and integrate material that the manufacturer never thought of.

Quote
And all of this is much more interesting in my opinion, given that it's hand-made by a small start-up out of the Balkans.

Yup. If you want to sound local, you've got to think like a local, and who better to do that? I like it.

Offline Eleftarios

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2018, 05:28:33 PM »
So many interesting points raised above, I just can't respond to everything. So I'll go with the historical for a broad-based response on how our species has confronted shifts in cultural technology.


The Gutenburg printing press was considered a severe threat to what was until then an oral culture of spreading knowledge and information. The Ottoman Turks banned it completely, which contributed to their falling behind in the developments of knowledge in the renaissance/reformation/age-of-enlightenment or whatever you want to call it. Catholic states like Italy only banned or suppressed certain publications -- Galileo a prime example. But protestant states by and large let it ride and reaped the benefits we inherit today.


Edison's cylinder, at least when it morphed into the gramophone and the 78 RPM disk, was considered the doomsday bell for live music. The last hundred+ years has proved that to be wrong. It did, however, kill the idea of the parlour piano and family sing-alongs. Not sure if that's such a bad thing, considering the voices in my family (and there was a piano).


I'm sure a few of you are old enough to have made use of the original Lotus123. It was nothing more than a basic calculator with a more human kind of visual layout. But many people who used it for business and work found ways of doing mercurial computations that the original developers never envisioned. That's because the end users were imaginative, lateral-minded people who could see how simple arithmetic is the basis for very complex ideas. The things they did are the basis of all current spreadsheet and database programs with all their complex scientific and financial functions, which at their core still remain nothing more than calculators with a lot of whiz-bang visuals.


Other examples of doomsday technology: TV will kill theatre; drum machines will kill drummers; sampling will kill all the horn players; cell phones will kill human contact; the internet will kill us all. The fact is, technology is absorbed and put to use in ways that we cannot see with our limited horizon -- especially us old coots. If we can't see the possibilities, our kids and grandkids certainly do. We are often knee-jerk in rejecting it, while future generations are simply absorbing it and making it a useful part of their lives.


So I'm in the camp that will always prefer making music on a technological device called a saxophone or clarinet. But I recognize the possibilities of something like this device, which for me would be a useful component in my composition studio. I doubt that I would use it in a live context. It could be very useful in certain situations, vis. there are no zurna or kaval or gaida players in my town -- indeed within 2000 kilometres. So if I wanted that sound for a legitimate musical purpose, such as a soundtrack or a live theatre sound cue, this may be the only alternative.


So why not use it?

Online sapapadop

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2018, 01:49:19 PM »
Really interesting points and discussion Eleftarios. I agree with you.

(Didn't anticipate such an existentialist discussion ensuing from my post, but it really is interesting!)

Offline mysacrifice

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Juzisound Midi Sound Module - Authentic Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian Sounds
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2018, 02:39:38 AM »
Oh yeah, a lot of interesting and intriguing points. That's the best part for me; when the music is combined with history, philosophy, psychology etc.


What I think is that is just the matter of choice, there is no need to judge for anyone for that. Some likes more acoustic, some likes more technological, and some somewhere between. My choice is acoustic as long as possible but as Eleftarios stated sometimes you don't have choice like finding Zurna.


Let everybody be free on whatever music they want to make in whatever way. I'm here to support always.

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« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2018, 11:48:49 AM »
sales will always tell you what the people want.
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